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FEATURE DOCUMENTARIES

Click on the posters for more information about the films

SWEEPING YEREVAN (Armenia) – 54 mins [U]
by Nairi Hakhverdi

In competition for Best Feature Documentary

Sweeping Yerevan is a poetic observational portrait of Marina, a woman who travels 40 km every night to sweep the streets of Armenia’s capital, Yerevan, dodging cars and putting her life at risk, in order to provide for her blind husband, live-in mother-in-law, unemployed son, and two young children.

RED ELVIS: THE COLD WAR COWBOY  (USA) – 94 mins [12A]
by Thomas Latter

In competition for Best Feature Documentary

Meet Dean Reed, the American popstar who defected to the Soviet Bloc in the ’70’s and became a superstar. He packs stadiums, preaches Marxism and inspires a generation…until his body is found, drowned, in a lake in East Berlin.

CANCELLED

THE ADVENTURES OF SAUL BELLOW (Israel) – 86 mins [12]
by Asaf Galay

In competition for Best Feature Documentary

The film traces Bellow’s rise to eminence and examines his many identities: reluctant public intellectual, ‘serial husband’, father, Chicagoan, Jew and American. Interviews with the novelist’s family and friends will shed new light on Bellow’s personality and the way he turned life into art.

WHERE LUNA LIVES  (Belarus) – 86 mins [PG]
by Aliaksandra Markava

Out of competition

While a real Armageddon is going on around, one large family are simply doing their best to survive and start an animal shelter.

IN HIS IMAGE  (Netherlands) – 76 mins [PG]
by Tami Ravid

In competition for Best Feature Documentary

In His Image focuses on reproduction after death in Israel, where posthumously harvesting sperm is legal.

AN AMERICAN BALLET STORY  (USA) – 95 mins [U]
by Leslie Streit

Out of competition

1964 – A time of major shifts in civil rights, women’s and gay rights. New York City was alive – you could feel it on the streets. The young Joffrey Ballet splits in two over a power struggle for artistic control and the HARKNESS BALLET bursts onto the New York City arts scene.

CRAZY CAT LADY (USA) – 102 mins [U]
by Garrett Clancy

Out of competition

An eclectic group of dedicated volunteers work tirelessly to mitigate the feral cat crisis in Los Angeles by trapping, spaying/neutering, fostering and adopting out as many cats as they can—but the challenge is immense and never-ending.

All proceeds from the screening will go to local charity CATS IN CRISIS

CHANCELA, THE NEW BLACK  (Israel) – 82 mins [U]
by Boaz A. Rosenberg

In competition for Best Feature Documentary

Chancela fled home at the age of six. As a young charismatic African-Israeli, he abandons community for fame and success in the big city. Coming of age, his origins emerge making him fight for his identity and face his violent refugee father. Now comes the inner conflict, tearing him Inside-Out almost like a REBIRTH. The Birth of his ‘NEW BLACK’.

SCORE UNTIL THE LAST DAY (Greece) – 77 mins [PG]
by Aris Tsiaras

Out of competition

Alphonso Ford was a successful basketball player, carrying a big secret

SHOVELLING PIXIE DUST  (USA) – 81 mins [U]
by Tim Landry

Out of competition

From producing an audacious short film, to becoming a Hollywood refugee, to building a Magic Kingdom, follow Tim’s adventures and struggles as he deals with the challenges of making magic.

GOODBYE TO ALL CATS  (New Zealand) – 77 mins [PG]
by Susan Bloom and Caleigh Waldman

Out of competition

Goodbye to All Cats is about the movement to eradicate domestic cats in New Zealand to protect endangered native species, which evolved without mammalian predators, and are crucial to the unique biodiversity of New Zealand.

HOT MONEY  (USA) – 118 mins [12A]
by Susan Kucera

In competition for Best Feature Documentary

With Intelligence and satire, former NATO Supreme Allied Commander, General Wesley Clark and his son Wes Clark Jr. take us on a journey through the complicated realities of our Financial system and its profound exposure to climate change. Combined with the wisdom of international business experts and academics, Hot Money is rich with historical context. It severs the knot of economic and political forces that may lead to societal collapse.

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